TCXPI Afrocentric Children and Youth Saturday School Program

tcxpiINFOThe Chinue X Project, Inc. (TCXPI) Afrocentric Children and Youth Saturday School Program will begin Saturday, January 16, 2016 at Impact Hub Oakland starting at 9am. For more information, please visit,  TCXPI FREE AFROCENTRIC SSP

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Warriors are 23-0; Thompson injured

Warriors are 23-0; Thompson injured

POSTED:   12/08/2015 06:26:34 PM PST0 COMMENTS| UPDATED:   ABOUT 4 HOURS AGO
INDIANAPOLIS — Klay Thompson sprained his right ankle Tuesday, and although X-rays were negative and the Warriors guard downplayed the injury, it didn’t have to happen.

That was a major source of the Warriors’ frustration after a bittersweet 131-123 win against the Indiana Pacers, one of the best teams in the Eastern Conference. Thompson scored a season-high 39 points and hit 10 3-pointers before ending his night on a sour note.

The 23-0 Warriors led by as many as 32 points and by 28 headed into a fourth quarter when Thompson and the starters were expected to rest. But they were forced to check back in with the lead whittled down to 16, and Thompson hopped off the court and walked to the locker room with a limp on his own power upon getting injured trying to put up a defensive challenge the backups had not.

Draymond Green (23) and Stephen Curry (30) of the Golden State Warriors celebrate against the Indiana Pacers at Bankers Life Fieldhouse on Dec. 8, 2015, in

Draymond Green (23) and Stephen Curry (30) of the Golden State Warriors celebrate against the Indiana Pacers at Bankers Life Fieldhouse on Dec. 8, 2015, in Indianapolis. (Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

“Guys go down, that’s on you,” Warriors reserve point guard Shaun Livingston said. “To me, that’s on the second unit. That was my fault. I take it personal. I feel like the starters did their job. They should have rested that fourth quarter, and it’s on us to hold the fort, and we didn’t do that as well tonight.”

Livingston told Thompson after the game he needed to be better in the fourth.

“We’ve still got to play better than that,” Thompson said. “It’s one thing if you don’t make shots, but it’s one thing to let up on the defensive end. We’ll get better from it.

“It happens. The other night, our second unit bailed us out in Brooklyn (extending a fourth-quarter lead). Tonight, it was the opposite. … I told him not to worry about it because they were great for us in Brooklyn the other night, and it’s a team game.”

Thompson said his ankle wasn’t badly sprained and that he “should be back in no time,” and the Warriors don’t play again until Friday at Boston. But the injury comes at a time when Harrison Barnes is out with a sprained ankle and Leandro Barbosa missed the Pacers game because of an illness.”It’s bitter because Klay sprains his ankle in a game we felt we had control of, and if we get out to a better start in the fourth, then we don’t even have to get him back on the court,” Warriors interim head coach Luke Walton said.

Still, the Warriors won their 27th straight regular-season game dating to last season. That matches the 2012-13 Miami Heat’s 27-game streak for the second longest in NBA history for streaks over one or multiple seasons.

Walton said what happened in the fourth shouldn’t take away from how well the Warriors played in the first three quarters.

Stephen Curry added 29 points on a night when it was Thompson who had the hot hand. Thompson was 10 for 16 from 3-point range, coming one away from his career high set on the night he exploded for 37 points in one quarter.

In less than five minutes, the Warriors put together a dizzying 22-0 run in the first quarter. Thompson scored eight of those points before passing the torch to Curry. The reigning MVP threw up a lob to Andrew Bogut for a dunk, hit two 3-pointers, and went around a defender for an up-and-under layup as the Warriors took a 37-21 lead.

The run provided half of the Warriors’ 44 points in the first quarter that matched the most points they scored in any quarter this season. The problem was, they gave up 40 to the Pacers in the fourth.

Paul George poured in 33 points for the Pacers, who cut the Warriors’ lead to six with 24.8 seconds left.

“You don’t want to ever have to win the game twice or three times,” Curry said. “It’s a long season. You want to make things as easy as possible.”

Said Andre Iguodala: “If we want to be great, we’ve got to play at a high level 48 minutes, players one through 15.”

  • The proposed Warriors Arena in San Francisco’s Mission Bay cleared another hurdle, NBC Bay Area reported. The city’s board of supervisors denied an appeal of the Environmental Impact Report for the arena, leaving opponents 30 days to take legal action.

    For more on the Warriors, see the Inside the Warriors blog at www.ibabuzz.com/warriors. Follow Diamond Leung on Twitter at twitter.com/diamond83.

Source: Warriors are 23-0; Thompson injured

HipHop TV Launches in Oakland

 

edloverhiphoptv
Ed Lover, HipHop TV VP, Artist Relations.

Oakland’s Watch Now Networks has launched a 24-hour streaming network for hip-hop content.

HipHopTV started streaming live on Monday at Hiero Day, a music festival hosted by Oakland’s Hieroglyphics collective that features top California hip-hop talent and annually attracts tens of thousands.

The network, which plans original programming alongside showing music videos, live performances and other content, is viewable on computers, mobile devices, tablets and set top boxes such as Apple TV and Roku.

Oakland’s Shawn Granberry, the founder and CEO, has a long history of promoting entertainment in the Bay Area. HipHopTV’s vice president of artist relations is Ed Lover, the New York radio personality who hosted early hip-hop television series “Yo! MTV Raps” in the 1980s.

Another soon-to-be launched network called Premo, based in San Francisco, appears to be aiming for a similar multicultural and Millennial viewer and haspartnered with Public Enemy frontman Chuck D for original musical programming.

However, unlike Premo, which plans a subscription fee of $4.99 per month, HipHopTV is free.

Oakland’s Watch Now Networks has launched a 24-hour streaming network for hip-hop content.

HipHopTV started streaming live on Monday at Hiero Day, a music festival hosted by Oakland’s Hieroglyphics collective that features top California hip-hop talent and annually attracts tens of thousands.

The network, which plans original programming alongside showing music videos, live performances and other content, is viewable on computers, mobile devices, tablets and set top boxes such as Apple TV and Roku.

Oakland’s Shawn Granberry, the founder and CEO, has a long history of promoting entertainment in the Bay Area. HipHopTV’s vice president of artist relations is Ed Lover, the New York radio personality who hosted early hip-hop television series “Yo! MTV Raps” in the 1980s.

Another soon-to-be launched network called Premo, based in San Francisco, appears to be aiming for a similar multicultural and Millennial viewer and haspartnered with Public Enemy frontman Chuck D for original musical programming.

However, unlike Premo, which plans a subscription fee of $4.99 per month, HipHopTV is free.

Source: HipHop TV Launches in Oakland

Sign up: Welcome to HipHop TV

Real Talk On Oakland, California

To ALL Oakland, California Natives,

With all that has gone on in Oakland in the last decade, I feel that it is time to bring together Oakland natives for serious dialogue on life in Oakland.

At a time in the near future, I would like to co-host a REAL TALK on being a product of Oakland, California.

My mission is to have respectful discourse on the VARIED perspectives of being a youth in Oakland during the 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s and how it has shaped us and how it relates to Oakland today.

Let me know your thoughts.

Cynthia D. Cornelius

 

 

Oakland Conservatory another victim of Oakland’s soaring rents

PUBLIC MUSIC CONSERVATORY
Director Angela Wellman conducts the band during a rehearsal of the Oakland Public Music Conservatory, Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015, at Westlake Middle School in Oakland, Calif. (D. Ross Cameron/Bay Area News Group)

By Tammerlin Drummond Oakland Tribune Columnist

POSTED:   12/02/2015

Angela Wellman’s lifelong dream, the Oakland Public Conservatory of Music, had reached its 10th anniversary milestone. But then late last year, things suddenly fell apart.

 The conservatory that the jazz trombonist cofounded to provide high quality, affordable music education for children and adults got gobbled up by what Wellman calls “the gentrification monster.” The building on Franklin Street in downtown Oakland that had housed the music school since 2004 was sold. Under the new ownership, the rent soared. The conservatory received a 30-day eviction notice 30 days before its youth prep academy was scheduled to start. Wellman hired attorneys and was able to stay through the end of 2014. Yet she was still forced to shutter her beloved conservatory and find storage for its vast collection of musical instruments. No small feat when you’re talking about 20 pianos, 25 violins, 20 guitars, 20-something congas, drum sets, trumpets, trombones, cellos, giant marimbas, steel pans, a vast music library, office furniture and supplies.
 “It was very traumatic,” Wellman says. “We started looking for a space but with the market the way it is, it was just crazy.”

Wellman decided to take the conservatory on hiatus for several months.

Now she’s back and is searching for a new permanent home. With the rents being what they are, her focus is deep East Oakland, which is one of the few remaining affordable areas in the city.

The conservatory may be currently homeless, but Wellman hasn’t let that keep her from her mission to provide free top-notch music education to urban children. In most jazz instruction programs, Wellman says, many of the students and teachers are white, studying music that originated with African-Americans. “Our kids don’t have the honor and privilege of studying at this deeper level that I and others are bringing,” Wellman says.

To that end, Wellman has teamed up with SFJAZZ to provide a free after-school music program for middle and high school students, funded in part by Arts for Oakland Kids and the Abundance Foundation. Most of the kids are African-American and from Oakland.

This school term, the new SFJAZZ-OPC Academy takes place in the band room at West Lake Middle School every Tuesday afternoon.Wellman, a third-generation jazz musician from Kansas City, Missouri, is the loving but no-nonsense conductor.

The students learn the techniques of playing in a jazz ensemble alongside adult musicians. Saxophone, bass and piano teachers come in on alternate weeks.

It’s not uncommon to see a jazz legend in the mix. One recent afternoon, Bay Area virtuoso guitarist Calvin Keys, who recorded with Ray Charles among many other greats, sat in on electric guitar.

Keys said he’s “trying to tell kids that there’s something to celebrate other than a drive-by.”

He was talking about the sad fact that all too-often when young people in urban neighborhood get together it’s to celebrate the life of someone killed in a street shooting. “We get these kids and show them how to play this art form and it’s beautiful,” Keys said.

Thirteen-year-old Aviv Schifrin of Berkeley, Calif., right, plays a solo during a rehearsal of the Oakland Public Music Conservatory, Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015, at Westlake Middle School in Oakland, Calif. (D. Ross Cameron/Bay Area News Group) (D. ROSS CAMERON)

After school, Rasec Barravino, 13, walks 2 ½ miles each way to the program for the chance to jam on his baritone sax. “I just love to play music,” he says.

Aviv Schifrin, an eight-grader from Berkeley, was a student at the conservatory before it closed.

“I was really disappointed and I kept asking my parents when I could go back to OPC,” he said.

The young trumpeter and his fellow musicians will perform Saturday at a youth music festival at First Unitarian Church of Oakland.

“We have a lot of kids who have a gift,” Wellman says. “And when you’ve got a gift, we’ve got to nurture that gift.”

Despite the obstacles, the Oakland Public Conservatory of Music is continuing to do just that.

The nonprofit holds its 10th anniversary gala Sunday. For more information go to http://www.opcmusic.org/Home.php

Tammerlin Drummond is a columnist for the Bay Area News Group. Her column runs Thursday and Sunday. Contact her at tdrummond@bayareanewsgroup.com or follow her atTwitter.com/tammerlin.

Source: Drummond: Oakland Conservatory another victim of Oakland’s soaring rents