All Power To The People: Black Panther At 50

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From October 8, 2016 to February 12, 2017, the Oakland Museum Of Califonia will display an exhibit in celebration of the Black Panther Party For Self Defense 50th Anniversary. For most Oakland natives this exhibit and era will bring back memories of an era in Oakland History.

For me, it reminds me of a time when Black Power and Black Pride held a place within the Oakland community. Where people came together for the uplifting of Black people and other people of color. For me it was a time when social programs were being created to support families within the community. For me it will remind me of a time when my father who dressed in Black Panther gear and made sure that the weekly publication of The Black Panther newspaper was always on his “man” stand.

 

Source: The Black Panther Intercommunal News Service

I am proud to have grown up during this time in Oakland – the good, the bad, and the ugly. From receiving a oppressive hegemonic education within the Oakland Public School System, to the police brutality that plagued the Oakland streets, to the segregation, to the racism that continues today. I am glad that I had parents who introduced me to aspects of Black life that helped to shape and mold me to who I AM today!

“ALL POWER TO THE PEOPLE.”

Cynthia D. Cornelius, TCXPI

MuseumCa.org: Social movement, political party, cultural influencer, government target, and Oakland-born—there are many ways to feel about the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, founded in October 1966. As the Black Panther Party celebrates its 50th anniversary this year, visit the exhibition All Power to the People for a contemporary view on the legacy of this visionary group, told from multiple perspectives. Rare historical artifacts, first person accounts, and new contemporary art show how the Party continues to inspire culture, activism, and community empowerment on local, national, and international levels.

Gain insights from former Black Panthers, artists, scholars, and community members about the Party—and how it continues to impact our lives and give meaning to the places around us. Examine a sweeping array of artifacts from OMCA’s collection and former Party members, along with never before seen photographs highlighting the everyday experiences and moments within the Party’s history. Uncover little-known aspects of this innovative group’s past in sections focusing on unheralded members of the movement such as women and rank and file, the Panthers’ revolutionary social programs, and how secret government programs led to the Party’s demise and influenced how it is remembered today. Throughout, consider why the Panthers remain controversial to some and inspirational to many, and how their political agenda continues to resonate with the social justice efforts today.

Source: Oakland Museum Of California Exhibit

 

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TCXPI Afrocentric Young Scholars SSP

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Please spread the word!

On January 16, 2016, TCXPI Afrocentric Young Scholars Saturday School Program began its First Session,  at Impact Hub Oakland. Eleven young scholars from community schools have enrolled in engaging awareness of African history and its many contributions made by African descendants to World and Human Civilization.

Held on Saturdays, TCXPI SSP brings Afrocentric Education to the Bay Area community, education that is not normally seen in our public school curriculum.

The Chinue X Project, Inc. (TCXPI) is the creation of Cynthia Chinue X Cornelius, MA.Ed. As an Oakland native, a product of the OPS, and mother to the same, Cynthia is all too familiar with the curriculum and how it has omitted, distorted and negated the many contributions made by people of African descent. She holds a Bachelors in Africana Studies, and a Masters in Equity and Social Justice in Education both from San Francisco State University. In 2011, she establish a 501(c)3 in  Maryland as a vehicle to disseminate Black History Facts and to bring awareness to African and African American History. She has a following on Facebook and features a page that focuses soley on Daily African/Black History Facts entitled On This Day In TCXPI History. Cynthia believes that the time is now for our nation’s public school systems to become culturally relevant and inclusive in what is taught in schools.

TCXPI’s goal for 2016 is to hold FOUR FREE six-week sessions beginning the second Saturdays of the months of January, April, July, and October. Each session will include engaging African-centred or Afrocentric activities that will facilitate instruction to each scholar in the history of their heritage and culture.

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First Session Young Scholars

To stay updated or to become a part of our program please contact Cynthia; to”Like and Join” our fb pages please visit: TCXPI Afrocentric Young Scholars Saturday School ProgramChinue X Rising, The Chinue X Project, Inc. (TCXPI), and I Love Oakland, CA. ILOC.

If a race has no history, if it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated.

Dr. Carter G. Woodson

 

 

 

The Oakland Promise

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Oakland pledges to fund college for poor

“From Cradle to Career”

Oakland will launch a citywide effort Thursday to triple the number of college graduates coming out of public schools, an ambitious and expensive “cradle to career” plan that aims to reverse cycles of poverty and hopelessness by raising expectations that all children can thrive in school.

The centerpiece of the Oakland Promise initiative is an infusion of grants, ranging from $500 college savings accounts for children born into poverty to college scholarships of up to $16,000 for low-income students. The money is intended to provide both real and symbolic support, signaling to kids and their families that there’s an investment in their future.

According to officials, who have spent six months developing the initiative and will announce the details Thursday at Oakland High School, it will cost $38 million to ramp up the program over the first four years and up to $35 million annually to sustain it. The money is coming from sources including foundations, philanthropists, the city and the school district.

The effort is something of an experiment, because no other place in the country has this kind of comprehensive, long-term strategy to send more kids to college, city officials said. But the need is great in Oakland, where 10 percent of the city’s public-school ninth graders graduate college.

“Yes, this initiative is ambitious,” said Mayor Libby Schaaf. “All my life I’ve seen this as the one thing that has held Oakland back.”

Over the next 10 years, officials said, Oakland Promise plans to open 55,000 college savings accounts, provide $100 million in college scholarships and serve 200,000 students and families. Every City Council and school board member has endorsed it, as have 100 community organizations, two dozen university officials and 200 leaders including the Rev. Jesse Jackson and Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom.

$25 million raised

While sustained funding is the central challenge, Oakland officials say they raised $25 million to launch the effort. The school district is expected to cover $1 million annually, and the city has committed $150,000, a number that may increase now that the initiative has begun, officials said.

The East Bay College Fund plans to contribute $1.5 million per year, while Kaiser Permanente and Pacific Gas and Electric Co. are giving $3 million and $1 million, respectively, to start up the program. Organizers will need $18 million more to cover the costs through 2020, an amount they say is reachable.

“It will be on us to make the case that eventually this would be one of the smartest public investments that any city could make,” Schaaf said.

That investment includes the $500 college fund for each child born into poverty — with eligibility tied to the same government standards that apply to free and reduced-price school lunches — as well as a $100 college account for every kindergartner, high school counseling centers and up to $16,000 in scholarships that come with individual mentors and support through college.

Belief in all kids

Oakland Promise combines successful initiatives from across the country, with a focus on disadvantaged youth and building “a culture of a college-bound city,” said David Silver, the mayor’s education director. Research shows that a child who has a college savings account of at least $500 is four times more likely to graduate college, he noted.

Middle-class families generally consider college a given, said city schools Superintendent Antwan Wilson. Poor children and families don’t — and they often don’t believe in the system. A $500 college account, he said, tells them the city believes in them and their future.

“Hope is extremely important. It’s called privilege, and the way privilege works is it gives you the ability to take things for granted,” Wilson said. “Odds are, a young person born into poverty in Oakland will live a life of poverty and have a shorter life.”

The prescription to change that, however, is expensive. The city’s plan is to ramp up the number of children served over the next four years and fully implement each piece within 10 years.

By this fall, 250 babies born into poverty will have $500 in the bank for college, according to the timeline, stepping up to 1,000 per year by 2020, and all 2,200 within a decade. Their parents will be also be eligible for up to $500 to support their child’s development. That will cost an estimated $5 million over the first four years.

In addition, every child entering kindergarten in a public school — about 4,600 each fall — will have $100 for college by 2020, and more in matching funds if their parents put in money. That will cost $2.9 million over four years.

In the same period, roughly $3.6 million will go to “future centers” at high schools to support applications for college and financial aid, with all slated to be open within 10 years.

College scholarships are the most expensive part of the plan, which calls for $1,000 to $16,000 to go to every financially and academically eligible student, with mentors assigned to them to ensure they get their degree. That will cost $25.5 million to scale up, with a goal of supporting 1,600 scholarship students per year within a decade.

To read full article, please visit source SF Gate.

Website: Oakland Promise

Become A Champion

Facebook: Oakland Promise

At-risk students improve when they take a race and ethnicity class – study

January 14, 2016

Stanford researchers concluded that ‘culturally relevant’ teaching is an important part of the education of students who could flunk or might drop out

High school students saw large improvements in their grades and attendance records when they enrolled in a class dedicated to exploring race and ethnicity, researchers in California found.

The Stanford University study analyzed a pilot program of ethnic studies classes at three San Francisco high schools and found that, on average, at-risk ninth-graders encouraged to enroll in the course performed significantly better than their peers who didn’t.

Student attendance increased by 21%, while grade-point averages surged nearly a grade and a half for those enrolled in the class – striking results, according to the researchers.

“I was surprised that this particular course could have such dramatic effects on the academic outcomes of at-risk kids,” said Thomas S Dee, a professor at Stanford who co-authored the study with postdoctoral researcher Emily Penner. “If I was reading a newspaper with results like this, I would read it with incredulity, [but] the results were very robust.”

CEPA Publications

2016 TCXPI Young Scholars SSP

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On Saturday, January 16, 2016, The Chinue X Project, Inc. began its first session of the 2016 TCXPI Afrocentric Young Scholars Saturday School Program at the Impact Hub Oakland, 2323 Broadway. (TCXPI SSP)

The program will be  be held in four six-week sessions beginning the second Saturdays of the months of  January, April, July, and October. It is offered to children 5-14 years old and will hold as its subject matter African History and the many contributions made by people of African descent to world and human civilization. Each Saturday session will run from 9-12 am and may change dependent on scheduled events.

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The program will have a non-traditional educational setting. The facilitated instruction will include but will not be limited to: Ancient African Civilization, African Geography and its Cultures and Traditions, and Kwanzaa and the Nguzo Saba. The young scholars will also experience theme-based community events during each six week session.

The goal of the program is to build each scholars African-centered knowledge base in order to extend their research and education for African heritage and culture.

For additional information on how to donate to our FREE program, please visit: GoFundMeFundly, or Eventbrite

For additional information on how to enroll your young scholar, please email: TCXPI Email

I hope that you will share this within your community. Our children deserve education that centers them as subjects, not objects; as victors, not victims.

Chinue X, Founder

TCXPI

 

 

 

 

 

California’s Support for K-12 Education Ranks Low by Almost Any Measure

BY JONATHAN KAPLAN

Although they do not refl ect how much it actually costs to provide California’s students a high-quality education, rankings of state K-12 education spending are frequently used to assess California’s investment in its schools.1 According to the most recent available information, California’s K-12 education spending lags the nation by almost any measure.

In 2014-15, California ranked 42nd among all states in spending per K-12 student after adjusting for differences in the cost of living in each state (see table).2 California schools spent $10,139 per K-12 student, $1,900 less than the $12,040 per student spent by the nation as a whole. These fi gures, and this California ranking, refl ect a new Budget Center analysis that adjusts the most recent K-12 spending fi gures for the variation in states’ costs of living.3 • California ranked 36th among all states in K-12 spending as a share of the state economy in 2014-15. California’s K-12 school spending in 2014-15 was 3.48% of state personal income – a measure that refl ects the size of the state’s economy – compared to 3.88% in the nation as a whole.

See Table in link below.

California’s Support for K-12 Education Ranks Low by Almost Any Measure